Make your own free website on Tripod.com
Home - Script
Quick Links:  
Top I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX
X XI XII XIII XIV XV XVI XVII XVIII End

© Kaleidoscope Entertainment, 1997
A MATTER OF HONOUR
shooting script
screenplay by
Susan Code & Steven R Cole
based on the story by
Susan Code

black with titles written over top:
"the following tale is based on actual events"

SCENE I: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
EXT: FOG-FILLED GRAVEYARD-DUSK

A low angle as the camera goes around markers in the graveyard. It stops when it comes to a stone and the picture goes to black.


"KALEIDOSCOPE ENTERTAINMENT
PRESENTS"


The camera continues to go along the ground by markers. A mysterious figure (LYON) wearing boots, pants and a white shirt walks into frame. We can't see who he is as he only see from the waist down. The camera comes up against his legs causing the picture to go to black.


"A STEVEN R COLE FILM"


The camera continues on its journey through the graveyard this time following LYON as he walks aimless along. The camera again runs into a marker a the picture goes to black.


"A MATTER OF HONOUR"


LYON walks along through the fog and stops in front of one stone in particular (Lyon's burial place). There is a flash of lighting and the crack of thunder. The shot cuts to directly in front of the stone and slowly moves forward. All that is visible on the marker is the date-1833.

SCENE II: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
INT: JOHN WILSON'S OFFICE-DAY

The camera pans across John Wilson's office and reveals JOHN WILSON sitting at his desk reading aloud from a personal journal. There are stacks of documents on his desk that he should be working on.


JOHN WILSON:

It cannot be, for love is bliss,
Not a heart-rending thing like this -
'Tis true there's one bewitching being,
And one whom I can scarce help seeing,
Who makes me every time we meet
Fain to say something wondrous sweet.


From over WILSON's shoulder we see him sign at the bottom of what he has written. The sound of footsteps can be heard from the hall. WILSON looks up at the door with a start.

Cut to ELIZABETH HUGHES as she enters the room.


ELIZABETH HUGHES:

Oh, I'm sorry. Did I startle you?


Cut to WILSON as he reacts by waving his hands furiously as if to say "no."


WILSON:

.....Ah....


He stops suddenly as he realizes how silly he looks. Cut back to ELIZABETH.


ELIZABETH:

I've just come to inform you, Mr. Wilson, that Mr Morris' man is here to collect his documents. I was passing through the hallway when he arrived and said that I would make you aware of his arrival.


Cut to WILSON.


WILSON:

Yes, yes of course, Miss Hughes. Thank you Miss Hughes.


He stops and looks at his desk and picks up some of the papers.


WILSON:

I have them right here and will take them to him directly.


Cut to an over-the-shoulder shot of WILSON looking at ELIZABETH as she turns to leave the room. WILSON raises his hand as if to flag her down. Cut to WILSON.


WILSON:

Excuse me, Elizabeth?


Cut to a shot from the hallway looking into the office. ELIZABETH is turned away from WILSON and smiles as he calls her name. She is flirting with him and pulling him along so she enjoys this game. She turns to face him as she speaks.


ELIZABETH:

Yes, Mr. Wilson?


Cut to Wilson as he stands up.


WILSON:

Nothing. I just wanted to thank you again, Miss Hughes.


Cut to Elizabeth.


ELIZABETH:

You're welcome.


She turns to leave for a second time. Cut to a shot from the hallway. We see her smiling again as she leaves. WILSON is sitting down at his desk in the background. Cut to a closer shot of WILSON as he gets a hold of himself and prepares for his meeting. He gathers the papers and leaves. Cut to a shot of the poem in the journal.

SCENE III: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
EXT: TAVERN - NIGHT
LYON enters the street via a gate and walks along to the steps that lead into the tavern. On the way he steps over a drunk that is passed out on the street. The camera dollys along to follow.

INT: TAVERN - NIGHT
Various shots of the patrons enjoying themselves in the establishment. The INNKEEPER serves a drink to DANIEL BUTLER, who then leaves his stool. Cut to LYON, who sees that vacant seat and heads toward it. As he sits down, cut to DANIEL who sees that his seat has been taken. He loses interest in the girl that he was talking to and confronts LYON.


DANIEL BUTLER:

Aye! What say you?


He belches as a result of too much drink. He then continues and plays for the crowd.


BUTLER:

That seat belongs to Daniel Butler. When I got off that coffin ship in Montreal, they gave me a location ticket for just that spot and ol' Jonathan here is going to give me m'deed just as soon as I drink him dry.

The bar crowd urges BUTLER to take on LYON and reclaim his seat. Cut to BUTLER, who is taking a couple of steps back from LYON to prepare to fight. He then lunges at LYON, using his arm as a battering ram. Cut to a shot behind Butler, facing LYON, who tilts his stool back and pushes BUTLER into another table. Patrons urge BUTLER on once again. Others dare LYON to fight like a man.

BUTLER gets up. LYON prepares for him once again. As BUTLER charges, LYON lays him a strong punch in the stomch. BUTLER drops to the ground. He then rolls away from the camera and makes a retching sound.

The room becomes quiet and LYON takes a look at the crowd. INNKEEPER quickly comes over with a tankard of ale and places it in front of LYON's seat. Lyon motions to pay.


INNKEEPER:

Compliments of the house.


As if the Innkeeper's service was a signal, the crowd starts about their business again. Then, from across the room, WILSON calls out.

WILSON:

Always the peacock, aren't you Lyon?


Cut to a close up of LYON, who is looking over his tankard. He puts it down on the table and turns to face WILSON, who is standing in the background. Pull focus so that WILSON becomes clear. WILSON takes a few steps forward. Cut to LYON.


LYON:

Why, did you want in on the action? If I had known you were here, my dear Wilson, I would have alerted Mr. Butler to the fact and let you take the fall.


Cut to WILSON, who is still slowly approaching. By the time is line is finished, both Lyon and Wilson are in the shot.


WILSON:

What really brings you to Bytown, Lyon? Are you 'executing' more orders for that bastard you call an employer, or did you just feel a need to associate with some of your own kind?


LYON:

For shame, Wilson. I just came for a pint of ale and a bit of feminine company.


LYON turns to look at WENCH. Cut to WENCH who sees LYON's glance and flirtatiously replies. Cut back to LYON and WILSON.


LYON:

Perth society is decidedly lonely these days, now that a delightful young lady has abandoned my companionship for that of another, more 'Gallic' gentleman. But, of course, you must be feeling the same pain as I, since you too have hoped for a tendre from that direction.


WILSON:

Why you...


WILSON jumps at LYON but LYON easily dodges him. WILSON crashes into the table and falls to the floor. LYON ends up in the arms of the WENCH.


LYON:

In fact, Wilson, Lelievre and I have frequently had the very delightful pleasure of a turn in the garden with those alluring ladies of the Boulton household. The bench under the lilac trees is a charming place for a comfortable coze.


LYON gets the WENCH to stand. The pair starts to walk across the tavern and are swallowed up by the crowd out of the reach of WILSON who is obviously angry.


LYON:

Landlord! Directions to your finest room, if you please!

SCENE IV: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
INT: ACKLAND DINING ROOM - MORNING
A shot of Inge Va showing that it is morning and at a different setting. Cut to inside, where GIDEON ACKLAND and ELIZABETH are sitting at the table eating. MRS ACKLAND enters the room sorting the mail. She hands part of the pile to GIDEON and takes her place at the table.


MRS ACKLAND:

Nothing terribly exciting today. Mostly correspondence relating to the school, Gideon. Although there is a note from that Lelievre for you Elizabeth.


She hands a letter to ELIZABETH while looking at GIDEON to see his reaction.


MRS ACKLAND:

I thought that Gideon had advised you of the inappropriateness of that liaison and you had broken off all contact with him.


Cut to ELIZABETH.


ELIZABETH:

Oh, ma'am, Perth society is so small, it is difficult to avoid anyone altogether, no matter how much you might want to discourage such an acquaintance. But you must admit, he is so very amusing and exciting, in a slightly dangerous sort of way.


Cut to GIDEON, who is expressing his distaste for what ELIZABETH just said while flipping through his mail.


GIDEON:

Exactly my point, Elizabeth. You need someone with a good head on his shoulders and his feet firmly on the ground. Someone like John Wilson. He is a fine, upstanding young man with a great future ahead of him, with the trust of this superiors. I know that he holds you in high regard and....speak of the - here's a letter from him in Bytown. See, he hold's Boulton's trust to represent him in his office's down there.


Cut to ELIZABETH.


ELIZABETH:

Oh, I know he has a tendre for me - he wrote me a Valentine - but he's just a poor school teacher pretending to be a lawyer. Besides, I heard that he has an understanding with some farm girl - Joanne, Joanna - from wherever it is he's from.


ELIZABETH then continues on eating her breakfast. Cut to GIDEON, who gets a look of great concern.


ELIZABETH:

Whatever is the matter? Surely, it's not bad news?


Cut to GIDEON.


GIDEON:

It is the worst kind of news, Elizabeth. If this is true, you have been both indiscreet and extremely foolhardy.


Cut to ELIZABETH.


ELIZABETH:

Whatever can you mean?


Cut to GIDEON.


GIDEON:

I mean that you and Caroline Thom, while under the escort of Mr. Lyon, have been meeting with that 'well-dressed, idle nobody' -as your brother so aptly puts it - Henri Lelievre. And, to make matters worse, you have allowed Lyon to sit alongside you with his arms in

GIDEON quotes from the letter

"a position which no woman of spirit would permit!"


GIDEON looks sternly at ELIZABETH. ELIZABETH is shocked and looks at MRS ACKLAND for support. MRS ACKLAND gives her a look of disapproval. Cut back to ELIZABETH.


ELIZABETH:

But that is false, Mr. Ackland. True, Caroline and I have enjoyed the company of Mr. Lyon. But never, ever has either one of us behaved in any way that would reflect badly on the school or ourselves. Mr. Wilson has been terribly misinformed by some malicious gossip-monger and seeks only to hurt me with these lies.


ELIZABETH gets up from the table and runs from the room. GIDEON watches her leave and makes no effort to stop her. MRS ACKLAND breaks the silence.


MRS ACKLAND:

Gideon, do you think that what the letter says is true?

GIDEON:

I have no reason not to. We both know that John Wilson is a God-fearing young man with no reason to lie. But, these are serious allegations, so, just to be sure, I want to discuss it with James Boulton. As it concerns his law student, the governess of his children, and his sister-in-law, Caroline, he deserves to know what is being said about them. And take appropriate action, if need be.

SCENE V: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
INT: COURTHOUSE - DAY
LYON starts to climb the staircase in search of what has been going on in Perth. From offscreen LELIEVRE calls out to him. Cut to a two-shot.


LELIEVRE:

Well, well, my young friend, I thought that was you. What is this I hear of you telling tales out of school?

LYON:

I wish that someone would tell me what tales are going 'round about me.

LELIEVRE:

Come now, Lyon. What can you expect when you besmirch a lady's good name? Escpecially a lady who enjoys the protection of Messieurs Ackland and Boulton. 'Tis odd, though, I do not ever recall her being so receptive to my advances, to my regret.


Cut to LYON as he realizes what is going on. He then sees GIDEON coming down the stairs and quickly goes to meet him. Alternate this dialogue sequence with over-the-shoulder shots.


LYON:

Ackland! What vile lies have you been spreading about me?

GIDEON:

I've done no such thing, Lyon. And I would appreciate it if you would not make a spectacle of yourself in the courthouse. Anything that I might have mentioned, in reference to your actions, is of no surprise to those of us who know your true character. The only difference now is that I have written proof.

LYON:

I demand that you tell me the name of this libeller.

GIDEON:

What, you have so many enemies that you need me to sort them out for you?


LYON is about to launch an attack on GIDEON when LELIEVRE steps between the two men. He places a hand on LYON's chest to calm him down. He turns his head to GIDEON.


LELIEVRE:

By the way, my friend, where is Wilson these days?

SCENE VI: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
EXT: STREET - DAY
LYON is walking the streets of Perth in search of WILSON with ADAM MUIR. They have been doing this for some time now and ADAM MUIR is growing impatient. ADAM MUIR stops at speaks to LYON.


ADAM MUIR:

Robert, we have walked up and down every street in Perth and, I tell you, if Wilson has indeed returned from Bytown, he is making himself scarce.


LYON:

Adam, all I want to do is ask that bastard to confirm the allegations he made against me and then, when he says 'yes', knock him from here to kingdom come. You will be a witness to Wilson's admissions of guilt.


Cut to a wider shot so that WILSON can be seen walking down the road. He is looking over some documents so he doesn't notice that LYON is up ahead. LYON then runs up to him. ADAM runs after him. When LYON reaches WILSON, he slaps his papers to the ground and grabs WILSON by the collar and slam him against the fence.


LYON:

I knew if I looked under enough rocks I'd find you. Tell me, did you write that letter to Ackland?


WILSON:

So what if I did? Miss Hughes is too good for someone like you.


LYON:

I think that it is time that you and I sorted a few things out, farmboy. As a student-at-law, you should know that society exists because of order. And the natural order of things dictates that you are scum, always have been and always will be. Now, as I recall, scum live in the mud but, somehow or another, you've managed to ooze out.


LYON presses himself right against WILSON, forcing him even harder against the fence. WILSON starts to struggle in an attempt to get free, but LYON's grip is too strong. LYON continues to push WILSON against the fence. When WILSON starts to struggle harder, LYON gives him a swift knee to the groin. He lets him go and WILSON falls to the ground, doubled over in pain. LYON motions to rough him up even more but ADAM stops him.


ADAM:

Hey, easy there Robert. You've roughed him up and I don't think he'll be giving you any more trouble. He'll know now to keep his place and not go sticking his nose into the affairs of his betters.


LYON:

I'm not finished instructing him yet, Adam. He's a damned lying scoundrel and I think he's in need of some private lessons.


LYON grabs WILSON and drags him behind the fence and starts to beat him continuously. ADAM winces at the sound of the beating and the long moans of pain.

SCENE VII: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
INT: ACKLAND PARLOUR - LATER SAME DAY
GIDEON is talking to SIMON ROBERTSON when WILSON staggers in and goes directly for a chair. He is bruised, his clothes muddy and his nose bloodied. His left eye quickly bruising.

GIDEON:

Good lord, John! What in God's name has happened to you?

WILSON:

....Ran into Lyon...

SIMON ROBERTSON:

More like a brick wall!

WILSON:

Not quite, just a wooden fence.

GIDEON:

This is inexcusable, John. I'm going over there right now and...


Cut to a closer shot of WILSON.

WILSON:

Don't bother, Gideon. He refuses to speak to you. He knows I wrote you the letter and he's not interested in any explanations. I insulted him so he was obliged to obtain staisfaction.


WILSON pauses and rubs his chin. It is aching from so much talking.

WILSON:

God, he and his kind make me ill. By the mere accident of birth he thinks he can lord over me; well I'm not standing for it. Not anymore. Now, I'm not satisfied, not by a long shot.


Cut to GIDEON who is worried about WILSON's condition.

GIDEON:

John, what are you babbling about?

WILSON:

Honour! Gideon, surley as a gentleman, and as a member of the Bar, you understand honour? And how it must be upheld, at all costs, against the barbarous influences of the lower classes?

GIDEON:

Yes, uh, no, John...

WILSON:

Yes, Gideon. The only way I am ever going to be respected in this town is if I meet Lyon on his terms. Simon.


Cut to SIMON.

WILSON:

I want you to take Lyon a message.


Cut to SIMON, who reacts fearfully, almost palling.

WILSON:

Tell him to name his seconds.


Cut to GIDEON who is stunned.

GIDEON:

John, I must vigourously protest this course of action.


Cut to SIMON.

SIMON:

I, too, John.


Cut to GIDEON.

GIDEON:

Before you send Simon anywhere, I must insist that you speak with Mr. Boulton. You are not thinking clearly. In fact, by the look of those wounds, I wouldn't be at all surprised if you weren't concussed. Yes, that's it. You're concussed.


He turns to SIMON for support.

GIDEON:

You have to be. You disapprove of duelling so you would have to have a serious head injury if you would even think about challenging a sportsman like Lyon to a duel.


Cut to SIMON.

SIMON:

I'll ask Boulton to come here. I'm sure that among us we can devise some other solution. I know Robert well. He was just blowing off steam and I'm sure he's forgotten all about it by now. A simple apology all 'round then it's drinks on me.


SIMON's attempts at cheer have no effect on the room. Cut to GIDEON.

GIDEON:

Yes, Simon. Go get Boulton. I believe he is at the courthouse. Hurry.


SIMON runs from the room. GIDEON goes over to WILSON and examines his wounds. He leaves and returns a few moments later with some water and a towel. He gently begins to clean some of the blood from WILSON's face.

GIDEON:

You and I have been intimates a long time John.


WILSON groans as GIDEON touches a tender part of his face.

GIDEON:

I've watched you work eighteen hours a day - teaching school in the morning, studying in the evening and articling for Boulton during the day. You assist Reverend Bell with his Sabbath school and you oppose violence of any kind. I also know that you manage to send some of your earnings home to your mother.


WILSON groans again.

GIDEON:

You have come so far in such a short time for the son of a poor Paisley weaver. And I know that you have a brilliant future ahead of you. Why do you want to risk it all by standing on some blasted 'field of honour' and getting blasted to smithereens? Good God, man, you're only twenty-three years old!


From out in the hallway footsteps and voices can be heard. GIDEON and WILSON turn to see who it is and SIMON and JAMES BOULTON enter the room. BOULTON quickly looks WILSON over.

JAMES BOULTON:

Well, John, you're a fine sight. I thought farm boys learned to fight before they learned to walk.


WILSON tends to his wounds with the towel as BOULTON proceeds to pace the room. He appears as if he is about to give a lecture.

BOULTON:

The decision to challenge another to a duel is a serious one and should only be undertaken if all other courses of reconciliation are deemed hopeless. And once issued, it is difficult to retract that challenge, if not impossible, and still retain your honour. I know.


BOULTON pauses for a moment and looks into WILSON's eyes.

BOULTON:

And because I know, I certainly do not feel that I can advise you one way or the other on what your ultimate course of action should be. This is your decision, John, and yours alone.


As BOULTON finishes his speech, WILSON closes his eyes in pain and in thought. GIDEON and SIMON watch nervously. WILSON suddenly sits up and turns to SIMON.

WILSON:

Simon, I want you to offer Lyon two options. Lyon can either make me a formal apology or he can meet me. His choice.

SCENE VIII: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
EXT: FOGGY GRAVEYARD - DUSK
LYON walks through the fog toward his own marker once. We still can't tell who he is. He crouches down to read the marker more closely. We see on the marker the following words:

"He fell in mortal combat"

SCENE IX: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
INT: ADAM'S HOUSE - EARLY MORNING
The early morning silence is being interrupted by a loud knocking on the door. ADAM is still asleep. The whiskey bottles lying on the floor reveal that he is hungover and slow to react to the noise. From outside you can hear LYON call out.

LYON:

Adam, you old sot!


ADAM begins to sit up and rubs his aching head. He looks at the door as LYON continues to pound on it.

ADAM:

Why is the door making so much noise?


LYON pounds on as ADAM slowly crosses the room to the door. He opens it and LYON lets himself in.

LYON:

It's about time you appeared. I've been pounding on that infernal door for ten minutes.

ADAM:

Yes, Robert, I wanted to talk to your about the door's pounding. It's not right...

LYON:

You're damn right, it's not right and you and I, my pickled friend, are going to meet Wilson and Robertson and show them so.

ADAM:

Going, Robert? Where are we going?

LYON:

To a duel, Adam.

ADAM:

You're mad Robert. No, you're still sleeping. It's only six o'clock!

LYON:

No, I am wide awake and very sane. Wilson has challenged me to a duel and I have accepted. I want you to be my second.

ADAM:

You are mad.

LYON:

Oh, I was last night when I agreed to sign that nonsensical apology and Wilson agreed to acknowledge that 'poison-pen' letter had been misunderstood, but I soon saw reason. So, I need a second and immediately thought of you. Only good manners, I thought, as you were witness to the first challenge.

ADAM:

No, Robert, I won't.

LYON:

There's nothing to be afraid of Adam. You know I'm a crack shot and I don't think Wilson could even hit the broadside of a byre. We'll trot out across the town limits, so as not to embarrass the sheriff, pace off and fire. I may graze, just as a warning, and he'll scare a few chipmunks. We'll all be home in time for dinner.

ADAM:

No, Robert, I won't.

LYON:

Look, I've obviously got you up from your bed. You wash, shave, have some breakfast - that will make you feel better - burn that shirt and I'll be back in a few hours to confirm the arrangements.


LYON leaves ADAM alone in his room.

SCENE X: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
EXT: DEPUTY SHERIFF POWELL'S OFFICE - MORNING
DEPUTY SHERIFF POWELL is sitting at his desk doing his morning routine. WILSON enters, papers in hand, bruised from his encounter with LYON the day before.

WILSON:

These are the papers that Mr. Boulton promised you, Sheriff Powell.

DEPUTY SHERIFF POWELL:

Thank you, John.


POWELL reaches up for the papers and notices WILSON's wounds.

POWELL:

That's quite a bruise you've got there. It must hurt.

WILSON:

It's getting better.


WILSON starts to leave when POWELL continues with the conversation.

POWELL:

Tell me, is there any truth to the rumours that you've challenged Robert Lyon to a duel?

WILSON:

A duel?

POWELL:

Hmmm. Well, just keep us both out of trouble, take it across the townline into the District of Johnston. Then it becomes Brockville's responsibility, if anything happens.

WILSON:

Nothing is going to happen, Sheriff.

POWELL:

Let's hope so, for your sake.

SCENE XI: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
EXT: GARDEN - MORNING
ELIZABETH is under some trees casually reading a book. LELIEVRE appears from behind a tree and startles ELIZABETH.

LELIEVRE:

My dear Miss Hughes. What an unexpected delight.

ELIZABETH:

Ohh!


LELIEVRE grabs the book that she was reading.

LELIEVRE:

Byron. You like poetry, Miss Hughes?

ELIZABETH:

Why, yes, Mr Lelievre. It's one of the subjects I teach to Mr. Boulton's daughters.

LELIEVRE:

But, of course, you are a governess and an appreciation of poetry is a requirement of every young lady's education. Non? But, do you think that Byron is entirely suitable for little girls? Such a scandalous life he led.


LELIEVRE steps close to ELIZABETH and begins to read a passage from the book.

LELIEVRE:

"The kiss, dear maid! thy lip has left shall never part from mine."


LYON calls from offscreen.

LYON:

Lelievre! What luck.


LELIEVRE steps back from ELIZABETH and she looks relieved.

LYON:

My compliments, Miss Hughes.


LYON bows to her and winks as he rises.

ELIZABETH:

Mr. Lyon.

LYON:

Not interrupting anything, am I?

LELIEVRE:

Nothing at all. We were just discussing some of the finer points of English literature, weren't we, Miss Hughes.

ELIZABETH:

Pardon? Oh, yes, of course.

LYON:

Well, as much as I would like to dally here myself with the fair Miss Hughes, I have some final details to arrange for an important engagement this evening.

LELIEVRE:

This evening, Lyon?

LYON:

Yes. Six o'clock, in fact. Wilson's meeting me, with Simon Robertson. And I still hope to persuade Adam Muir. In fact, I'm on my way back to his lodgings now.

LELIEVRE:

Do you mind if I accompany you?

LYON:

Not at all.


LYON turns to ELIZABETH.

LYON:

As always, Miss Hughes, it has been a pleasure to spend even just a few moments in your charming company.


LELIEVRE bends over ELIZABETH's hand.

LELIEVRE:

Mademoiselle.


The pair begin to leave when LELIEVRE stops and returns to ELIZABETH.

LELIEVRE:

Ah, I believe this is yours.


He returns her book and they leave.

SCENE XII: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
INT: ADAM'S HOUSE - MID-MORNING
LYON and LELIEVRE have returned to ADAM's house. The scene starts with ADAM answering LYON request to be his second.

ADAM:

No, Robert. I've shaved, washed, had my breakfast and sent my nightshirt to the washerwoman's, but I have not changed my mind. I thank you for the "honour" of your invitation but I will not be your second and I urgently advise you to sign that apology.

LYON:

I need a second. Everything is arranged for six o'clock this evening, on the banks of the Tay, just beyond the town limits on Colonel Powell's farm. Dr. Hamilton has agreed to officiate, and slap some sticking plaster if need be, but I must have a second.


The room is quiet as all three stand there waiting for ADAM's response. LELIEVE breaks the silence.

LELIEVRE:

Well, the solution is very simple. Wilson has insulted your good name and, therefore, must not be allowed to go unanswered. If Muir refuses to be your second, then I must take up the gauntlet, so to speak.

ADAM:

You, Lelievre?

LYON:

Well, why not?


LYON goes over to LELIEVRE and shakes his hand vigorously and uses his other hand to thump him on the shoulder.

LYON:

We'll Make a glorious display on the field.

SCENE XIII: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
INT: JAMES BOULTON'S OFFICE - LATE AFTERNOON
BOULTON is hard at work when JAMES HUBBELL bursts into the room. The force of his entry scatters some of the papers that he was working on. Outside, a storm is starting to brew. HUBBELL is panting when he speaks.

JAMES HUBBELL:

Boulton, you've got to stop them!

BOULTON:

Stop who, James. And what do you think you are doing storming in here like this?

HUBBELL:

Wilson and Robertson, that's who. They're meeting Lyon and Lelievre on the banks of the Tay at Powell's farm.

BOULTON:

It's about to rain, Hubbell. Why would anyone want to meet anybody down by the river in weather like this?

HUBBELL:

It's not a bloody picnic, Boulton. They're duelling and, as Wilson is your employee, I feel that it is your duty to stop him.

BOULTON:

Calm down, Hubbell. Wilson already knows my opinion in this matter. He's not going to do anything foolish and besides, I'm not about to risk my death by going out there to repeat myself.

HUBBELL:

It's not your death I'm worried about, Boulton. This is serious. We don't have a minute to lose. Now, where is your coat?

BOULTON:

It's at the house. I didn't wear on today as I didn't expect it to rain.

HUBBELL:

We don't have time to get it now. We've got to stop them before it's too late.


HUBBELL grabs BOULTON by the arm and quickly marches him out of the office.


SCENE XIV: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
INT: ADAM'S HOUSE - EARLY EVENING - RAINING OUTSIDE
ADAM is pacing about his room, trying to decide what to do about the events that are about to unfold. He finally comes to a decision.

ADAM:

I will follow them and make sure that no one comes to any harm.


ADAM then quickly grabs his jacket and runs out the door. Cut to:


EXT: GRAVEYARD
LYON and LELIEVRE are on their way to the duelling site. They decide to cut through the graveyard to shorten the trip. ADAM, who is following behind them, almost looses his nerve when he sees this. He waits and watches the pair continue on.

SCENE XV: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
EXT: READE'S BAKERY - RAINING
WILLIAM READE, a boy of about thirteen, is working hard to finish before night falls. He stops when to figures enter the lot. WILLIAM turns to see POWELL and GIDEON standing there.

POWELL:

Laddie, have you seen two men come by?

WILLIAM:

Aye, Sheriff, and noo too long ago.

GIDEON:

What did they look like?

WILLIAM:

Well, one had on a cloak...


GIDEON interrupts him before he can finish.

GIDEON:

That's them.


The two men hurry off as WILLIAM watches intently. As soon as the leave the lot, the pair meets BOULTON and HUBBELL. After a quick conversation, they all hurry off. WILLIAM shrugs this off and returns to work.


SCENE XVI: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
EXT: BANKS OF THE TAY RIVER - EVENING - RAINING
DOCTOR HAMILTON is standing with SIMON and LELIEVRE underneath umbrellas to protect themselves from the rain. SIMON and LELIEVRE are looking over the duelling pistols before they are loaded.

DOCTOR:

Gentlemen?


LELIEVRE cocks the hammer into place.

LELIEVRE:

Everything is in order, Dr. Hamilton.

DOCTOR:

Fine. Mr. Wilson? Lyon? Will you come forward and take your places, please.


LYON and WILSON are given their weapons that were chosen by their seconds. LYON appears confident but WILSON is obviously uncomfortable. SIMON shows WILSON how to operate the pistol. The two men take their place on the field and wait for DOCTOR's count-off.

DOCTOR:

1,..2,..3,..4,..5,..6,..7,..8,..9,..10.


WILSON and LYON turn to fire simultaneously. There is a loug "bang" from the weapons and smoke starts to form around them. Cut to:


EXT: READE'S BAKERY
WILLIAM hears the sound and looks up in surprise. He drops what he is doing and runs off to investigate. Cut to:


EXT: BANKS OF THE TAY RIVER
WILSON and LYON are standing twenty paces apart, the smoke from the weapons still surrounding them. WILSON's arm falls to his side as he is unable to hold the weapon any longer. SIMON runs to him and takes the pistol from his hand. He tries to calm him down by patting him in the shoulder. As SIMON does this, WILSON slowly raises his hand and brushes aside a lock of hair.

WILSON:

I felt the bullet, Simon.

SIMON:

What? Are you alright?

WILSON:

I felt it brush my hair.

SIMON:

I don't see a mark, John. Are you sure?

WILSON:

I felt t brush by my forehead.


DOCTOR then calls for the seconds to return.

DOCTOR:

Will the seconds please come forward?


LELIEVRE and SIMON return the weapons to DOCTOR.

DOCTOR:

Everything appears to be in order, gentlemen. Now, I think that it would be in everyone's best interest if we took a few minutes to reflect and then, perhaps, seek a reconciliation. Mr. Wilson and Mr. Lyon have conducted themselves well here this evening and I think it is safe to say that honour on both sides has been satisfied.

LELIEVRE:

Ah, but that is where you are wrong, my good doctor. Honour has yet to be satisfied this evening.

SIMON:

Whatever can you mean, man? We have conducted ourselves according to the Duelling Code. Shots have been exchanged....

DOCTOR:

I'm going to speak with Lyon.


DOCTOR walks over to LYON who is standing alone by the river, watching the water flow by.

DOCTOR:

Lelievre wants to continue. For God's sake, Lyon, is there no way to put a stop to this unfortunate business?

LYON:

Doctor, it is impossible. You know as well as I that the Duelling Code states that when one man gives the other the lie and then that man retorts with a blow, no reconciliation can take place until after two discharges each, or a severe hit.


LELIEVRE appears from nowhere.

LELIEVRE:

We have not had a 'hit', Dr. Hamilton.


DOCTOR opens his mouth to argue the point but soon sees that it would be useless. Instead, he stomps off to WILSON and SIMON.

SIMON:

Are they argeeable to a reconciliation, Dr Hamilton?

DOCTOR:

No.

SIMON:

We are prepared to meet them half-way. In fact, we are quite anxious that this matter be brought to a peaceful conclusion.

DOCTOR:

I'll try again.


DOCTOR turns around to approach LYON and LELIEVRE once again. However, upon doing so he sees that the two men are standing by the weapons. LYON has one in hand and is pointing it toward them.


SCENE XVII: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
EXT: A SMALL RISE OVERLOOKING DUEL SITE - RAINING
POWELL, GIDEON, BOULTON and HUBBELL arrive atop the small rise just as the previous scene ends. ADAM soon joins them and brief greetings take place.

BOULTON:

Can you tell who is who?

ADAM:

No. It's raining too hard to distinguish them. Do you think we should go and interfere?

GIDEON:

No. There doesn't appear to be any harm done.

HUBBELL:

This weather is enough to dampen the most rabid hot-head.

BOULTON:

Well, I can at least be comfortable.


BOULTON sits down on a fallen log. HUBBELL looks down upon him and the rains runs off the brim of his hat onto BOULTON's shoe.

BOULTON:

Relatively speaking.


WILLIAM approaches the group of men. He is struggling with a large umbrella.

BOULTON:

Hey, who is that young lad? Should he be here?

POWELL:

William Reade, isn't it? Your father's the Clerk of the Peace, isn't he? What are you doing here? Shouldn't you be minding your works?

WILLIAM:

Tis milking time, sir. I've come to round up the cows. Kinna help y'sirs?

GIDEON:

Oh, were just looking....


SCENE XVIII: [ Home | Top | Previous | Next | End ]
EXT: BANKS OF THE TAY RIVER - RAINING
SIMON and LELIEVRE are once again inspecting the weapons under DOCTOR's supervision. No one speaks a word. SIMON does his inspection quickly and nods. LELIEVE barely looks at the weapons at all.

DOCTOR:

Gentlemen?


WILSON and LYON come forward. LYON quickly grabs the closest weapon to him. SIMON has to pick up the pistol and hand it to WILSON. He gives him a slight push toward the field. The rain continues to pour down heavily. LELIEVRE approaches LYON.

LELIEVRE:

Stand in the middle of the furrow.


LELIEVRE then points down to WILSON.

LELIEVRE:

It will give you a direct line to his heart.


LYON stands looking down toward WILSON as LELIEVRE walks away. The rain runs down his face and into his eyes. He brings his hand up to whipe away the rain. He lowers his hand. Cut to:


EXT: FOG-FILLED GRAVEYARD - DUSK
LYON is standing before his marker. The camera is tight on his face and pulls out ot reveal that it is him standing there looking at his own stone. He becomes frightened and covers his eyes with his hand. He lowers it to look again. Cut to:


EXT: BANKS OF THE TAY RIVER - RAINING
LYON is looking down at WILSON. His vision has obviously shaken him as he is not as confident as he was before. He raises his pistol in a straight line to WILSON. WILSON sees this and he also become frightened.

WILSON:

I shall fall.


WILSON brings his pistol up. The two men stare at each other for a moment. WILSON shudders, turns his head, a the two men fire as a thunderclap lets loose. Cut to:


EXT: A SMALL RISE OVERLOOKING DUEL SITE - RAINING

HUBBELL:

Oh my God! Wilson's down!


The group of men rush forward to the duel site. Cut to:


EXT: BANKS OF THE TAY RIVER - RAINING
The camera slowly dollys along the ploughed furrow. It reveals a man (LYON) lying spread eagle in the mud. The camera stops before revealing the identity of LYON. DOCTOR rushes over and attempts to tend to the blood-gushing wound on the right side of his chest. LELIEVRE is very shocked at the outcome of the duel. He steps backward and then turns and runs away.


As the group of men approach the field, POWELL stops WILLIAM.

POWELL:

Laddie, go get your father. We need him to issue a warrant.


WILLIAM turns and runs the other way. POWELL continues on.
DOCTOR continues work on LYON and realizes that there isn't much to do for him. He looks at his face and the audience sees who is down. LYON is grimacing in pain.
POWELL approaches WILSON and SIMON. He takes the pistol from his hand.
LYON gasps his last breathe and dies on the field.


WILSON looks from SIMON to POWELL.

WILSON:

It should have been me.


Cut to an overhead closing shot of the duel site. POWELL stands with WILSON and SIMON, who make no attempt to flee the scene. LELIEVRE is gone. The others are looking at the body of LYON, sad to see a life cut short.


Fade to black.


Fade in:


"John Wilson and Simon Fraser Robertson were arrested in the killing of Robert Lyon and stood trial in Brockville, Ontario two months later. Acting in their own defence, they were found not guilty by the jury."


Fade out.


Fade in:

"Wilson eventually followed James Boulton to Niagra. He had a successful career, both before the bar and on the bench. He eventually became the Member of Parliament for London and a member of the Supreme Court of Ontario."


Fade out.


Fade in:

"In the spring of 1835, John Wilson married Elizebeth Hughes. They had three children. Justice Wilson died on June 3rd, 1869, a respected and revered man. His wife lived until 1904, dying at the age of ninety-three."


Fade out.


Fade in:

"Henri Lelievre, considered by many to be the real culprit in the affair, fled Perth immediately following the duel and never stood trial."


Fade out.


Fade in:

"Robert Lyon was laid to rest in the same burial ground that he passed through on his way to the duelling site."


Fade out.


Fade to a shot of Lyon's marker.


Fade to black.

© Kaleidoscope Entertainment, 1997


Top I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX
X XI XII XIII XIV XV XVI XVII XVIII End
Home - Script
Quick Links: